on the corner jon hatch

On the Corner Vol. 12 Issue 4, Q4 2019

On the Corner Vol. 12 Issue 4, Q4 2019

I was recently rummaging through old interview notes for On the Corner newsletters and I found some pretty neat history published in OtC the past 13 years. Seeing the stack of hundreds of copies of past newsletters, it reminded me what a wonderful neighborhood of people in the LC. I’m not sure there is a

more rich neighborhood in Boulder. But while looking through these old files I came across some interesting items and one was this article written by a neighbor who did not print his/her name. It offers a great perspective on this area in the neighborhood from 27 years ago. So I have no idea who shared this with

me or where it came from. Please read it and let me know if you know, or if you have a guess. Or maybe it’s you! Thank you and enjoy, JON HATCH

“The Neighborhood”

By Anonymous, 1992

This was a neighborhood of young families in those days. Its history, however, went back to the early years of the century. In 1904, David Dobbins bought 179 acres from the county and two years later subdivided it into Floral Park and Interurban Park. Floral Park included the blocks between 15th and 20th Streets from Baseline Road to Bluebell Avenue. Interurban Park contained the blocks between Bluebell and Chautauqua (now King) Avenues from 15th to 20th as well as all of the land east of Floral Park to what is now South Broadway. Dobbins' intent in making the original purchase was to find ground suitable for a perpetual care cemetery. He was instrumental in organizing the Boulder CemeteryAssociation, supervised the laying out of roads and of cemetery plots (in what is now Green Mountain Cemetery), but after about two years sold his interest in the Association. Read more

HATCH SELLS LOWER CHAUTAUQUA!

HATCH SELLS LOWER CHAUTAUQUA!

Dear neighbors and friends, this year marks the 13th anniversary of the very first edition of your On the Corner newsletter. I began publishing OtC in the early days of my real estate career as a way to bridge my professional photojournalism career and my real estate career. It’s kept me very engaged in this neighborhood, which has so many stories to tell. This spring also marks my 15th year in the real estate business. It’s awesome to have grown such a successful business. I’ve worked really hard to make it this far and I definitely recognize that a lot of my business comes from right here in the neighborhood.

On the opposite of this big card you’ll see homes that I sold here in 2019. Each of them are so different and they all have such interesting histories. Like many homes here, they also have been through different transformation over the years. The homes built in the LC have just as interesting stories to tell as the residents that call Lower Chautauqua home. “If these walls could talk,” right? Such rich history here, and that’s why I appreciate it so much. And I appreciate you. You’ve entrusted me to market and sell your homes and you’ve trusted me to help you buy the house here that you now call home. The many homes I’ve sold here dot the neighborhood from Bellevue Heights to Interurban Park and from the Cul-de-sacs off King Avenue to Baseline Road. Many of you have referred business to me over the years and for that I am grateful and truly appreciate your business and your referrals! I’d like to continue to earn your trust. Please contact me anytime to discuss selling or buying real estate. I’m happy to offer a market analysis of your home anytime, with no strings attached! Sincerely, HATCH

Boulder County Buzz - February 2019

Boulder County Buzz - February 2019

Love is in the air in Boulder County

It's February and love has been buzzing in the air here in Boulder County. I picked a bad week to stop eating Ghirardelli chocolate and Dunkin’ Donuts, but I’ll be fine this Valentine's season.  Read more…

On the Corner Vol. 12 Issue 2/3, Q2+Q3 2018

On the Corner Vol. 12 Issue 2/3, Q2+Q3 2018

House became home for the Carlsons

By Silvia Pettem

In 1949, three years after Vivian and Carroll Carlson were married, the young couple purchased a brand-new house on Baseline Road in the Interurban Park subdivision. Now, almost seven decades later, Vivian still calls it home.

The neighborhood had been platted years earlier, in 1908, when the “Interurban” railroad first ran through the University of Colorado and then south on what today is South Broadway. The commuter trains continued to operate until 1926.

For the next two decades, the subdivided land between part of Park Avenue (now Baseline Road) and Green Mountain Cemetery was rural and sparsely settled. When the Carlsons’ moved in, the population of Boulder was just under 20,000. But post-World War II growth would quickly usher in big changes... READ THE NEWSLETTER

Boulder County Buzz - December 2018

Boulder County Buzz - December 2018

Wishing You and Your Family a Happy Holiday Season!

Dear friends and family, I want to wish you a Happy Holiday season and a Happy New Year. What a year it has been and 2018 will be my best year in the real estate business. I have so much to be grateful for and I’m glad so many of you were a part of my year. I have so much gratitude for you all for looking out for me and putting my name out to family and friends.

There are many things from 2018 that I will carry into 2019, and some things I will leave behind. It is the time for yearly projections of what's to come in our real estate market in 2019. As we transition into the new year I reflect on the year we've had. Pundits profess that the market may balance out next year, but we'll have to wait and see what really happens. I’m positive it will be a strong year and I already have many buyers and sellers preparing for a transition in 2019. Also, don't miss the fun housing design trend article with inspirational ideas for updating your home in the next year.

Now, please fly with me to my featured listing this month at 625 University Ave. in Boulder, a turn of the century cottage in west Boulder with awesome potential and an amazing lot.

I hope you enjoy your time with loved ones this holiday season. And try to reach out to those you know who may be alone to share good cheer. I appreciate your continued business and referrals. Warmly, HATCH

READ THE FULL NEWSLETTER

Boulder County Buzz - August 2018

Boulder County Buzz - August 2018

Boulder County is Popular in the News this Month

Hi friends, real estate in Boulder County is still as active and busy as ever. Just when I thought the usual late summer doldrums were upon us, business never really slowed and I owe that to so many of you or looking out for me and my biz. But see the July Stats below for more details, too. The Buzz this month highlights a fun feature on the city of Boulder from the Washington Post. Check it out! It's great to see our local city and many of our favorite businesses getting so much attention. This will probably inspire more people to move here...which is great for sellers, but means more competition for buyers.

Another interesting trend that's affecting our local real estate market is the high number of seniors moving to Colorado. Did you know that this is one of the top places in the country to retire?

Also, it’s that time of year again for back to school...and the good news is, your kids can do their homework on Pearl Street now because Google has brought free WIFI to the pedestrian mall. Shya!

Thanks for being such awesome friends and clients and for all your support and trust. It’s been an awesome summer and now it’s time for go back to school and to go Phishin’! Don’t forget to give to your favorite charity this month! All the best you. Thank you, HATCH

READ THE FULL NEWSLETTER

Boulder County Buzz - July 2018

Boulder County Buzz - July 2018

Boulder County's Thriving Market and Mid-Year Report

Hello friends, I think we’ve passed the midway point through summer. Ugh! Have you done, or will you do all the things you said you were going to do? I hope so. I’m still working at mine. I still want plan another trail half-marathon, but that might have to wait till fall as I’m too busy chasing kids and trout and Phish. 

Summer hail storms have been damaging to homes and vehicles, but not to the real estate market — it’s still very dynamic. While the intensity of the early spring rush has waned, it’s still a market where we see more than one offer in the first few days. But things are little bit more balanced for buyers and sellers. Is it possible the average price of a home in the city of Boulder is almost $1,250,000.00? Have condos and townhomes really gone up 25%+ in the city of Boulder last year? Perhaps… perhaps not. We're halfway through 2018 already, and the Mid-Year Stats reveal information you don't want to miss! 

The Buzz this month also features some tips on what you can do with your real estate equity, as well as an article from RE/MAX of Boulder’s owner discussing the average price of homes in the city of Boulder. What does that mean for the rest of the year? How will the fall market play out? I can’t wait to find out! 

With all the fascinating events happening in our area, I hope you have a wonderful rest of your summer. And by next month, we’ll already think about getting our kiddos back to school. Ethan will be a junior and Phoebe with be a freshman at Boulder High School. 

This month I’m featuring another community non-profit program, There With Care who, since 2005, has been providing support for families during the critical phase of a medical crisis, easing their daily stresses with compassion and care. Program for youth in Boulder. Please see how important this program is and consider giving today. I did!

Also don’t forget to tune in to Part 26 From the Trail and listen to what my mom and dad are so grateful for. They’re awesome! Thank you for coming along with me, HATCH

READ THE FULL NEWSLETTER

Boulder County Buzz - June 2018

Boulder County Buzz - June 2018

Boulder County is Busy and Thriving this Summer

  Happy Summer Solstice everyone! Well, between the extreme dry heat one day and the heavy hail storms the next, it’s no wonder we’re all amped up, here on the Front Range. Or maybe that’s just because it’s summer. And like last year at this time, the real estate market isn’t as dynamic as the previous few months. Buyers and sellers are seeing a difference in the market than even from a month ago and it’s important to help manage buyer and seller expectations in real time. My buyers are realizing they can take a little more time to decide on a home and they can make offers without necessarily removing conditions or offering above list price, while still having the winning offer. The number of properties under contract is down considerably and it may take a little longer for sellers to sell their home. It may be safe to say we’re in a buyer’s market in many cases. But not all markets within Boulder County, or even within the same town, behave the same — so please contact me if you want to learn more about what’s happening in your neck of the woods. 

Check out this month’s Buzz: Boulder County is getting a lot of attention — with a local city, Superior, CO having scored slots on several “Best Places to Live” lists, and countless fun and creative events happening throughout the summer. Check out the article below from BizWest outlining the recent Boulder Economic Summit, and learn how our real estate market is impacted by both housing and transportation issues.  May Stats are in: inventory is fluctuating, and prices are continuing to rise. The Buzz this month explores these topics and more!

Finally, and more importantly, is what’s happening with immigration reform where families being separated at our border. Attention is needed now for the people that are providing help for children who are being taken away from their detained parents. Today I’m featuring RAICES, The Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services, a Texas-based nonprofit organization dedicated to providing immigrant families and refugees with affordable legal assistance. You can donate money to support its team of 130 attorneys and staff members Please consider giving today. We did!  Thank you, HATCH

READ THE FULL NEWSLETTER

Boulder County Buzz - March 2018

Boulder County Buzz - March 2018

Spring Brings Nicer Weather and More Competition

Days are longer, leaf buds emerge, song birds call, crocus whittle their way out of winter detritus and fish are rising up like birds! Ah, the music of spring. As life emerges around us, so does the spring real estate market here in Boulder County. Yes, it’s getting busier here and as green replaces brown, we are seeing a good surge in properties pop up for sale. My new listings this have sold or will close soon. It’s been good and steady and fun so far this year and I’m reminded that I made a really good choice 14 years ago to take this adventure.

The Buzz this month features articles that question what will happen with higher prices and fewer homes on the market. What does this mean for first time home buyers and affordability? And what will happen next year as Google ads a third building to their campus, bringing more employees to the area?

Don’t miss the 2018 RE/MAX of Boulder Real Estate Report where we take a closer look at what’s happening with the local market.

And be sure to check out this month’s featured property, coming in April. It’s near Chautauqua Park and sure to impress. I’m really excited to market this one.

I’m starting something new in The Buzz this month: I’ll be featuring a community non-profit program and this month’s charity for giving is Growing Gardens in Boulder. Please see how important this program is and give today. I did! 

Remember, if you have questions about any real estate decisions this year, please give me a buzz. Thank you again for your continued support of my business. Happy Easter Holiday to you all, HATCH

READ THE FULL NEWSLETTER

On the Corner Vol. 12 Issue 1, Q1 2018

On the Corner Vol. 12 Issue 1, Q1 2018

Haertling and Wagener, architects who shaped Boulder, both buried at Green Mountain Cemetery

By Carol Taylor

A stroll through Green Mountain Cemetery is a contemplation on the many personalities in history who contributed to Boulder. Standing out are two innovators, Charles Haertling and Hobart Wagener, architects who shaped Boulder’s built environment and created an inventory of striking mid-century modern structures.

Both men were born in the 1920s, both had Midwestern roots, both served in the U.S. Navy and both moved to Boulder in the 1950s. In addition, they both worked for Boulder architect James Hunter before starting their own practices.

Each architect left an impressive body of award-winning designs, many of which are now city landmarks, including residences, churches and public buildings. All the while they both raised families and served the community in civic and philanthropic organizations… READ THE NEWSLETTER

Boulder County Buzz - February 2018

Boulder County Buzz - February 2018

Fall in Love with Real Estate

And it happened on Valentine's Day. Another mass shooting, and it makes it hard to gather useful thoughts for a newsletter about real estate. I hope one day soon we can solve this problem. Martin Luther King, Jr. said, “Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.” 

After a little reprieve, the market seems to be taking January’s momentum right into February. I sound like a broken record but here we go again with finite inventory and a glut of buyers driving this market. With, in many cases, multiple offers going over list price. It feels similar to last year at this time; the market came early and then peaked early, in May. Maybe this year will be the same. Maybe not. I’m ready for whatever happens. And let me know if I can help you be ready, too. Consider what your plans for the year are and how I can help you in executing them. 

The Buzz this month highlights trends through RE/MAX of Boulder's monthly statistics. As we know, the market is often changing, and I am here to keep you informed with what is happening throughout the Boulder County area. Please holler if I can help you, your family or your friends on their real estate adventure in 2018.

In the meantime, try to be grateful for who you have and what you have. Please tune in to Part 24 From the Trail and see what my new friends from Louisiana are grateful for.  Sincerely, HATCH

READ THE FULL NEWSLETTER

Boulder County Buzz - December 2017

Boulder County Buzz - December 2017

Wishing You a Joyous Holiday and Happy New Year!

Dear friends and family, I want to wish you a Happy Holiday season and a Happy New Year. What a year it’s been and I have so much to be grateful for. I’m glad so many of you were a part of my year. Be sure to visit the HATCH YouTube channel to see Part Twenty-Two From the Trail where you’ll find inspiration from my friend Kristin Gablehouse, who’s discovering, with her husband Josh, how long distance ultra-running and trail racing has become her way to manage life after a traumatic brain injury that she suffered on a cycling trip in 2015. Her story is captivating and it should remind us that good relationships, patience, not giving up, kicking ass and being grateful for what we have are important holiday messages.

I’ll need to think about what things from 2017 I will carry into 2018, and what things I will leave behind - I’ll be sure to let you know. I do know this; regarding real estate, the end of 2017 brings many projections about the 2018 market. Don’t miss the article this month that quotes RE/MAX of Boulder’s DB Wilson and what he foresees will happen to the market next year. Also, did you know that more people are moving out of Colorado than in recent years? Check it out, and more, in this month’s exciting Buzz. 

I hope you enjoy your time with family and loved ones this holiday season. And try to reach out to those you know who may be alone. I appreciate your continued business and referrals. Warmly, HATCH

READ THE FULL NEWSLETTER

On the Corner Vol. 11 Issue 4, Q4 2017

On the Corner Vol. 11 Issue 4, Q4 2017

Chautauqua turns 120: From teachers’ retreat to National Historic Landmark

By Carol Taylor

It was quite a prize when Boulder landed the Chautauqua, 120 years ago, in the early months of 1898. Several other towns vied for the teachers’ retreat planned by the Texas Board of Regents, but Boulder officials impressed them with spectacular mountain scenery on a narrow gauge railroad trip.

The Texans chose a Chautauqua for their program, because the American Chautauqua movement was in full force. From the 1890s-1920s literally thousands of Chautauquas popped up all over the country as education and entertainment for the masses, featuring lifelong learning, oration and the arts.

Boulder agreed to provide the land and an auditorium as well as a dining hall for the new Texas-Colorado Chautauqua. The challenge was how to pay for this exciting amenity.

Boulder was a small town of about 6,000 residents, with a fledgling University and a collection of small businesses, but no cash for such a large project. A bond election could raise the funds to purchase the Batchelder

Ranch and other necessities, officials decided. With some hearty encouragement at the polls, the bond passed overwhelmingly in a municipal election in April of 1898. READ THE NEWSLETTER

Boulder County Buzz - November 2017

Boulder County Buzz - November 2017

Thanksgiving Wishes for You and Your Family

 

As one of my favorite holidays approaches, it’s with warmth that I wish you and your loved ones a Happy Thanksgiving. Autumn is the time to cozy up around the fireplace or gather around the table with family and friends. It’s a time to recall what you’re grateful for. I’m grateful for you. Thank you for being a friend and for looking out for my business. Read more...

On the Corner Vol. 11 Issue 3, Q3 2017

On the Corner Vol. 11 Issue 3, Q3 2017

One of Boulder’s Civilian Conservation Corp units bunked

by Chautauqua By Carol Taylor

One of Boulder’s Civilian Conservation Corp units bunked by Chautauqua By Carol Taylor Like the rest of the country, Boulder suffered in the Great Depression. Thankfully, programs from President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s administration helped get people back on their feet. FDR established the Civilian Conservation Corp by executive order on April 5th of 1933, as part of his New Deal. The CCC pubic works programs helped ease the suffering of the Depression by putting able-bodied unmarried young men to work.  The youngest (18-25 year olds) made $30 per month, while team leaders and assistants earned a little bit more. The majority of each worker’s paycheck was deducted and sent home to their needy families...  READ THE NEWSLETTER

Boulder County Buzz - September 2017

Boulder County Buzz - September 2017

Looking Ahead this September in Boulder County

Mother Nature sure has an interesting way of reminding us that she’s in charge of the climate and weather that swirl all around us each day. After experiencing the 2013 flood here in Boulder, I feel compassion for those who have been impacted by these magnificent acts of nature; from the beautiful solar eclipse, to the heinous hurricanes battering our coastal and Caribbean communities and from the fires in the west to the sunsets painted for us each evening - Mother Nature’s in charge. And I give thanks as we’re reminded to band together and be resilient when she throws punches. The silver lining. Read more....

Boulder County Buzz - August 2017

Boulder County Buzz - August 2017

August Means Back to School in Boulder County

Oh my! It’s back to school for the kiddos this week? Yes, it is! And it’s back to business after a quick road trip for Phish tour for me and Kristin. But the market is definitely interesting right now. Inventory is up and homes are staying on the market longer. And I’m seeing more price reductions now. Demand has decreased as fewer buyers are searching for homes this time of year. But not to worry, this shift is normal, and I’m curious about what will happen over the next few months and even into early next spring. But I remain positive — it’s actually great news for buyers because things aren’t quite as competitive as they were this spring, and buyers have a greater chance of getting the home they want without the crazy competition.

Boulder County Buzz - July 2017

Boulder County Buzz - July 2017

Boulder County's Thriving Market and Mid-Year Report

July in Boulder County is hot as usual, in terms of local temperatures, but our real estate market is cooling down a bit. Demand has softened and inventory has increased, bringing about a bit of welcome normalcy. The articles this month reflect a theme of change in the air. Amazon bought Whole Foods? Yes! How will our local shopping experiences and commercial real estate market be impacted by this? There's also a construction worker shortage that is affecting the pace at which new construction can be built to accommodate those migrating to Colorado. Don’t miss the second quarter stats to compare what’s happening in your Boulder County city, now that we’re halfway through 2017... READ MORE

On the Corner Vol. 11 Issue 2, Q2 2017

On the Corner Vol. 11 Issue 2, Q2 2017

Early Chautauquans loved the Switzerland Trail

By Carol Taylor

Legend says it was the spectacular scenery on a mountain train ride that helped clinch the Chautauqua for Boulder.  Boulder had been competing with other Colorado towns for the privilege of establishing a restorative cultural retreat for Texas schoolteachers. 

In February of 1898, Texas educators arrived in Boulder to survey proposed sites for a new Chautauqua.  “The prize is too big to be allowed to slip away,” stated the Daily Camera editor Lucius Paddock.  Community leaders feted the group, showed them around town and arranged a special treat – a ride in the mountains on the narrow gauge Colorado & Northwestern railroad.  On the trip up to the town of Sunset, Chautauqua officials were amazed by the dramatic mountain splendor. READ THE NEWSLETTER

On the Corner Vol. 11 Issue 1, Q1 2017

On the Corner Vol. 11 Issue 1, Q1 2017

Henrietta Lives!

By Carol Byerly

It looks like Henrietta is going to make it.  The elderly Plymouth Rock chicken has survived raccoon attacks, coyote raids, the neighbor dogs, and the dramatic weather extremes of Colorado.  Now she was the sole survivor of an electrical fire that killed the other seven chickens, ages four months to a year, in her coop.  

Early Monday morning I was drawn to the backdoor by the lights of fire trucks from the rescue station just blocks from my house.  Over the fence I saw that my neighbors’ chicken coop, a sturdy little house on stilts, was engulfed in flame.  Oh no, I thought, those poor chickens.  I knew my neighbors were out of town and saw the house sitter, Liz, standing stock still in the middle of the yard, still in her slippers, arms folded, watching as the firemen efficiently and thoroughly put out the fire with their hoses and picks and dragging out all of the flammable material required to raise chickens.  Both curious (I admit) and wanting to support Liz, I went over to help and console.  Liz told that when she ran to the flaming coop, when she opened the door, all of the chickens were on fire, but for one in a corner who somehow escaped the fireball and hopped or fell out of the coop.  “Henrietta” I said, “she has survived all the other traumas here.”  And on the ground behind the coop, amidst the four or five firemen in their full yellow and black rubber suits and hoses and big helmets, I saw a small, shuddering pile of feathers... READ THE NEWSLETTER