chautauqua boulder

On the Corner Vol. 12 Issue 2/3, Q2+Q3 2018

On the Corner Vol. 12 Issue 2/3, Q2+Q3 2018

House became home for the Carlsons

By Silvia Pettem

In 1949, three years after Vivian and Carroll Carlson were married, the young couple purchased a brand-new house on Baseline Road in the Interurban Park subdivision. Now, almost seven decades later, Vivian still calls it home.

The neighborhood had been platted years earlier, in 1908, when the “Interurban” railroad first ran through the University of Colorado and then south on what today is South Broadway. The commuter trains continued to operate until 1926.

For the next two decades, the subdivided land between part of Park Avenue (now Baseline Road) and Green Mountain Cemetery was rural and sparsely settled. When the Carlsons’ moved in, the population of Boulder was just under 20,000. But post-World War II growth would quickly usher in big changes... READ THE NEWSLETTER

Boulder County Buzz - September 2018

Boulder County Buzz - September 2018

September Brings Interesting News and More

Hi friends and family. Well, the evenings are getting cooler and the kids are deep into school, which means September is upon us. This seasonal transition brings changes in our real estate market and we need to modify how we price homes for our sellers and make offers for our buyers. And will changing interest rates effect sales in our area? Read the featured articles below for more info.

It’s been a big year so far for Real Estate in Boulder County with median sales prices for single family homes up 7% over last year, and it will be exciting to see how this fall market and the fourth quarter will unfold. If you have any questions about the current market or anything regarding your Real Estate decisions or your home, I’m here to answer those questions.

Please fly with me to my new featured property this month at 625 University Ave. in Boulder. This one is special for the buyer who wants a cool project in a really awesome part of West Boulder.

In the meantime, for some fun, please tune into Part 27 From the Trail to get a first-hand glimpse of our ride aboard the Ride of Steel at Darien Lake Amusement Park in New York, last month.
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And speaking of fun rides — this month I’m featuring another community non-profit program, The Carousel of Happiness, in Nederland, CO. The Carousel is a piece of living folk art inspiring happiness and joy. With 56 whimsical, hand-carved animals atop a 1910 carousel, it attracts visitors of all ages and many people with disabilities. Your donation helps to keep The Carousel accessible and inspire happiness and connection among all who visit. Please see how important this program is and consider giving today! 

Thank you for your business and thank you for tuning in, HATCH

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Boulder County Buzz - June 2018

Boulder County Buzz - June 2018

Boulder County is Busy and Thriving this Summer

  Happy Summer Solstice everyone! Well, between the extreme dry heat one day and the heavy hail storms the next, it’s no wonder we’re all amped up, here on the Front Range. Or maybe that’s just because it’s summer. And like last year at this time, the real estate market isn’t as dynamic as the previous few months. Buyers and sellers are seeing a difference in the market than even from a month ago and it’s important to help manage buyer and seller expectations in real time. My buyers are realizing they can take a little more time to decide on a home and they can make offers without necessarily removing conditions or offering above list price, while still having the winning offer. The number of properties under contract is down considerably and it may take a little longer for sellers to sell their home. It may be safe to say we’re in a buyer’s market in many cases. But not all markets within Boulder County, or even within the same town, behave the same — so please contact me if you want to learn more about what’s happening in your neck of the woods. 

Check out this month’s Buzz: Boulder County is getting a lot of attention — with a local city, Superior, CO having scored slots on several “Best Places to Live” lists, and countless fun and creative events happening throughout the summer. Check out the article below from BizWest outlining the recent Boulder Economic Summit, and learn how our real estate market is impacted by both housing and transportation issues.  May Stats are in: inventory is fluctuating, and prices are continuing to rise. The Buzz this month explores these topics and more!

Finally, and more importantly, is what’s happening with immigration reform where families being separated at our border. Attention is needed now for the people that are providing help for children who are being taken away from their detained parents. Today I’m featuring RAICES, The Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services, a Texas-based nonprofit organization dedicated to providing immigrant families and refugees with affordable legal assistance. You can donate money to support its team of 130 attorneys and staff members Please consider giving today. We did!  Thank you, HATCH

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Boulder County Buzz - May 2018

Boulder County Buzz - May 2018

Get Outside and Enjoy Beautiful Boulder County

Hello friends! Well, the Boulder real estate market has hit a new milestone with the average sales price of single family homes in the city of Boulder reaching $1,207,403 at the end of March. What does this mean for affordability and diversity? RE/MAX of Boulder’s owner, Jay Kalinski, wrote about this in an article in BizWest this month. And, don’t miss the Best of Boulder awards announcing that readers have chosen RE/MAX of Boulder as the #1 real estate agency. What an honor! The Buzz also features some cutting edge redecorating tips so you can enjoy your home more today, and make it easier to sell down the road. 
I’d also like to wish all of you Buzz readers who are mothers, a happy belated Mother’s Day - you rock! 

I hope you’re all getting out to enjoy the beautiful spring weather like we’re having in Boulder with rain and sunshine and rain again. It’s so green here!

This month I’m featuring a community event, Climb Out of the Darkness; an event committed to bringing people together, united, to honor the struggle to overcome perinatal mood disorders. The community climb, on June 23rd, will promote awareness, prevention and treatment of mental health issues related to childbearing in every country, worldwide: In support of moms & dads, community programs and healthcare providers. Please see how important this program is and consider participating in the climb, or by giving today. I did! Thank you again for your friendships and your business, HATCH

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On the Corner Vol. 12 Issue 1, Q1 2018

On the Corner Vol. 12 Issue 1, Q1 2018

Haertling and Wagener, architects who shaped Boulder, both buried at Green Mountain Cemetery

By Carol Taylor

A stroll through Green Mountain Cemetery is a contemplation on the many personalities in history who contributed to Boulder. Standing out are two innovators, Charles Haertling and Hobart Wagener, architects who shaped Boulder’s built environment and created an inventory of striking mid-century modern structures.

Both men were born in the 1920s, both had Midwestern roots, both served in the U.S. Navy and both moved to Boulder in the 1950s. In addition, they both worked for Boulder architect James Hunter before starting their own practices.

Each architect left an impressive body of award-winning designs, many of which are now city landmarks, including residences, churches and public buildings. All the while they both raised families and served the community in civic and philanthropic organizations… READ THE NEWSLETTER

On the Corner Vol. 11 Issue 4, Q4 2017

On the Corner Vol. 11 Issue 4, Q4 2017

Chautauqua turns 120: From teachers’ retreat to National Historic Landmark

By Carol Taylor

It was quite a prize when Boulder landed the Chautauqua, 120 years ago, in the early months of 1898. Several other towns vied for the teachers’ retreat planned by the Texas Board of Regents, but Boulder officials impressed them with spectacular mountain scenery on a narrow gauge railroad trip.

The Texans chose a Chautauqua for their program, because the American Chautauqua movement was in full force. From the 1890s-1920s literally thousands of Chautauquas popped up all over the country as education and entertainment for the masses, featuring lifelong learning, oration and the arts.

Boulder agreed to provide the land and an auditorium as well as a dining hall for the new Texas-Colorado Chautauqua. The challenge was how to pay for this exciting amenity.

Boulder was a small town of about 6,000 residents, with a fledgling University and a collection of small businesses, but no cash for such a large project. A bond election could raise the funds to purchase the Batchelder

Ranch and other necessities, officials decided. With some hearty encouragement at the polls, the bond passed overwhelmingly in a municipal election in April of 1898. READ THE NEWSLETTER

On the Corner Vol. 11 Issue 3, Q3 2017

On the Corner Vol. 11 Issue 3, Q3 2017

One of Boulder’s Civilian Conservation Corp units bunked

by Chautauqua By Carol Taylor

One of Boulder’s Civilian Conservation Corp units bunked by Chautauqua By Carol Taylor Like the rest of the country, Boulder suffered in the Great Depression. Thankfully, programs from President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s administration helped get people back on their feet. FDR established the Civilian Conservation Corp by executive order on April 5th of 1933, as part of his New Deal. The CCC pubic works programs helped ease the suffering of the Depression by putting able-bodied unmarried young men to work.  The youngest (18-25 year olds) made $30 per month, while team leaders and assistants earned a little bit more. The majority of each worker’s paycheck was deducted and sent home to their needy families...  READ THE NEWSLETTER

On the Corner Vol. 11 Issue 1, Q1 2017

On the Corner Vol. 11 Issue 1, Q1 2017

Henrietta Lives!

By Carol Byerly

It looks like Henrietta is going to make it.  The elderly Plymouth Rock chicken has survived raccoon attacks, coyote raids, the neighbor dogs, and the dramatic weather extremes of Colorado.  Now she was the sole survivor of an electrical fire that killed the other seven chickens, ages four months to a year, in her coop.  

Early Monday morning I was drawn to the backdoor by the lights of fire trucks from the rescue station just blocks from my house.  Over the fence I saw that my neighbors’ chicken coop, a sturdy little house on stilts, was engulfed in flame.  Oh no, I thought, those poor chickens.  I knew my neighbors were out of town and saw the house sitter, Liz, standing stock still in the middle of the yard, still in her slippers, arms folded, watching as the firemen efficiently and thoroughly put out the fire with their hoses and picks and dragging out all of the flammable material required to raise chickens.  Both curious (I admit) and wanting to support Liz, I went over to help and console.  Liz told that when she ran to the flaming coop, when she opened the door, all of the chickens were on fire, but for one in a corner who somehow escaped the fireball and hopped or fell out of the coop.  “Henrietta” I said, “she has survived all the other traumas here.”  And on the ground behind the coop, amidst the four or five firemen in their full yellow and black rubber suits and hoses and big helmets, I saw a small, shuddering pile of feathers... READ THE NEWSLETTER